In the end what separates a man from a slave? Money? Power? No, a man chooses, and a slave obeys!

(Source: dragonborn, via cultofbioshock)

thouhastablog:

Jean-Michel Basquiat

(via sympathyfortheartgallery)

davidtyler31:

Peter Sellers, three different roles: Captain Lionel Mandrake,President Merkin Muffley, and Dr. Strangelove.

Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Stanley Kubrick (1964)

(via robertdinnero)

sympathyfortheartgallery:

The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) -Marcel Duchamp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

sympathyfortheartgallery:

The Bride Stripped Bare by Her Bachelors, Even (The Large Glass) -Marcel Duchamp at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

mountainhousestudios:

Jylian Gustlin

mountainhousestudios:

Jylian Gustlin

fancypancakes:

confused-companion:

whoever wrote this line needs to receive a medal

I will reblog this until my fingers bleed

fancypancakes:

confused-companion:

whoever wrote this line needs to receive a medal

I will reblog this until my fingers bleed

(Source: tastefullyoffensive, via vibratingsounds)

(Source: idolfried, via cultofbioshock)

(Source: airows, via r2--d2)

sympathyfortheartgallery:

grupaok : On Kawara, 13th Street Studio, 1966 [updated: RIP]

sympathyfortheartgallery:

grupaok : On Kawara, 13th Street Studio, 1966 [updated: RIP]

inneroptics:

Man Ray - “James Joyce”

inneroptics:

Man Ray - “James Joyce”

archatlas:

Casa Tomada Rafael Gómez Barros

"The urban interventions are meant to represent displacement of peasants in his native Columbia due to war and violence, themes that resonate in one form or another in any country his work is displayed in. Crafted from tree branches, fiberglass, and fabric, the 2 foot ants are particularly striking when seen clustered aggressively on facades of buildings."

(via 99percentinvisible)

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: Think yesterday’s Pic was strange? I’ll give you strange. I caught this new piece by Jordan Wolfson, titled “Female Figure”, yesterday at David Zwirner, a few days before the end of its run. “All” it is is a superbly crafted animatronic sculpture of a woman that dances for a few minutes as you watch, its every motion perfectly matching the motions of a real human being … with pole-dancing skills. (Click on the image to see her – sorry, it – move.) Most eerie of all – what makes it seem utterly alive – is the way its gaze locks with yours and then follows your eyes wherever you go in the room. You’re glad this femme fatale is tethered to her mirror (getting a woman to bipedal around in high heels is still beyond the reach of robotics, as it’s almost beyond the reach of flesh and blood) because if she were free to approach as she pleased, you’d have to take off running. (Note that perfect facial expressions are also beyond robotics, and Wolfson hides that fact by giving his figure a mask.)
Should most of the credit for this piece go to the engineers rather than the artist? Is it just a way-cool piece of tech? Sure – but remember that once upon a time, perspective was “just” a new technology, as were oil paints, but the first examples of their use count as landmark works of art.
I am also perfectly aware of the real and vital feminist issues that our android raises, and her ties to the cheesiest traditions of bad SciFi. But I’m afraid that I can’t keep all that in mind once her hips start swiveling. (Courtesy Jordan Wolfson, David Zwirner, New York, and Sadie Coles HQ, London)
The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

blakegopnik:

THE DAILY PIC: Think yesterday’s Pic was strange? I’ll give you strange. I caught this new piece by Jordan Wolfson, titled “Female Figure”, yesterday at David Zwirner, a few days before the end of its run. “All” it is is a superbly crafted animatronic sculpture of a woman that dances for a few minutes as you watch, its every motion perfectly matching the motions of a real human being … with pole-dancing skills. (Click on the image to see her – sorry, it – move.) Most eerie of all – what makes it seem utterly alive – is the way its gaze locks with yours and then follows your eyes wherever you go in the room. You’re glad this femme fatale is tethered to her mirror (getting a woman to bipedal around in high heels is still beyond the reach of robotics, as it’s almost beyond the reach of flesh and blood) because if she were free to approach as she pleased, you’d have to take off running. (Note that perfect facial expressions are also beyond robotics, and Wolfson hides that fact by giving his figure a mask.)

Should most of the credit for this piece go to the engineers rather than the artist? Is it just a way-cool piece of tech? Sure – but remember that once upon a time, perspective was “just” a new technology, as were oil paints, but the first examples of their use count as landmark works of art.

I am also perfectly aware of the real and vital feminist issues that our android raises, and her ties to the cheesiest traditions of bad SciFi. But I’m afraid that I can’t keep all that in mind once her hips start swiveling. (Courtesy Jordan Wolfson, David Zwirner, New York, and Sadie Coles HQ, London)

The Daily Pic also appears at blogs.artinfo.com/the-daily-pic. For a full inventory of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive.

saatchiart:

"I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.” –Jean-Michel Basquiat (Photo: New York Times Magazine, 1985)

saatchiart:

"I don’t listen to what art critics say. I don’t know anybody who needs a critic to find out what art is.” –Jean-Michel Basquiat (Photo: New York Times Magazine, 1985)

(via scrambledcreatures)